Total Knee Replacements: Why, What & When

knee replacement physio

Despite the birthday cake, getting old is rarely a cause for celebration. At least physically. Nobody ever said I can’t wait till I’m 70. Many joints ache, your bladder never really feels empty, and a full uninterrupted night’s sleep makes up the bulk of your birthday wishes. If you add stiff, grindy arthritic knees to that equation, it’s easy to see why you don’t like to leave the house without being a little grumpy. So when Total Knee Replacements became a thing, it’s no wonder your eyes lit up like a 30 year old. Finally, a solution to the knee pain that wakes you up multiple times a night.

So now that this is an option for you, and many others of the vintage disposition, let’s take a deep dive and answer the three main considerations you’ll have to think about before going under the knife.

  • Why would I need a Total Knee Replacement?
  • What actually happens during the procedure?… and if you qualify
  • When is the right time to go under the knife?

Disclaimer: This is for Educational Purposes Only

Let me take a quick intercession to inform you as to the nature of our advice. We are experienced, healthcare clinicians. We wish to share our experience with you on topics to do with your health. We may be a little colourful in doing so, but at the heart of what we do is in-the-trenches experience. Whilst we have achieved academic success and understand the evidence, we are not solely evidence-based. We are, however, EVIDENCE INFORMED. 

We find that the evidence is usually 10-15years (at minimum) behind what we are seeing in the clinic. We see real people, with real problems, and we’ve made a great living out of offering real solutions. 

If all you’re after is the researched evidence, you can find some HERE, or you can very easily look for more on Google. We want to give you real-life advice, most of which you may not find in the research.

There is no way that this document can replicate or replace expert assessment and guidance given by a qualified registered healthcare practitioner who has seen you personally. I am sure you’re aware that I have no knowledge of your personal medical history or how you take care of your body. If you require care from a qualified practitioner, you would be best served by seeing someone who can empathise with your situation and treat you accordingly.

I’m sure you understand that I disclaim any and all responsibility for anything you do as a result of reading this document. And by reading this article, you accept 100% responsibility for the actions of you or anyone under your care.

The main reason why you might need a total knee replacement is basically due to Arthritis. When the top thigh bone (femur) meets the bottom shin bone (tibia), they meet together and connect together through ligaments. The surfaces that meet have a soft cartilage over them (articular cartilage) and a firmer cartilage between them, called the meniscus. This creates your knee joint which is also surrounded by more ligaments that encapsulate the joint and protects it.

Over the majority of your lifespan you will get wear and tear over that joint that is predicted by two main factors, genetics and high impact loading through the joint. Things like running and jumping. If Arthritis develops, even to a moderate amount, that could lead to a lot of grinding, and stiffness and achiness and lots of pain. When that pain gets to a point where it’s affecting your quality of life, where you can’t exercise, and more importantly when you can’t sleep, then it may be time to consider a Total Knee Replacement. Not having this procedure could mean a deterioration of your health due to not being able to function and get around.

Okay, now you’re thinking about getting a Total Knee Replacement, it’s important that you actually know what happens during that procedure. So basically when you have a lot of wear and tear on your knee joint and you need to get that joint replaced, they’re going to replace that joint with a combination of metal and plastic. So what they do is they cut and shave back the bottom part of your thigh bone (femur) and replace that with a metallic structure that mimics what the end of that bone used to look like. And then they cut and shave back the top of the shin bone (tibia) and they first put a layer of metal on top of that bone as a base. Then they put another piece of plastic that mimics the way the end of that bone used to look like.

So basically when you’re done, you have a metal structure (top) articulating with a plastic surface (bottom). And that forms the new knee joint. They then stitch you back up, and then they get you going with a rehabilitation program that goes on for anywhere up to 6 months. That particular procedure shows actually really good outcomes. Some studies have shown good outcomes, with satisfaction at about 89%. While showing poor satisfaction outcomes at about 3%. Based on those numbers it’s a procedure we actually recommend if you need it.

Knee operation recovery

When considering Total Knee Replacements, the WHY part is actually pretty easy. There’s lots of wear and tear, there’s lots of arthritis and there’s an immense amount of pain. The WHAT bit is actually pretty stock standard. The procedure is done well these days, and
you’ll get generally good outcomes. The WHEN question is actually a harder question to
answer. When should I get the knee replacement? How long should I wait until I consider Total Knee Replacement?

The conventional wisdom is that you wait it out as long as possible. You wait until you can’t bear the pain anymore, and then you go and see your surgeon and he does it for you. I have a problem with that particular piece of advice because I don’t like the fact that people become deconditioned. If you wait 6 months, 1 year too long, there’s every likelihood that you can lose a lot of muscle, and that could have detrimental health effects on other parts of your health.

If you have respiratory conditions, or diabetes, high cholesterol, even weight gain, it is probable that these conditions will get worse because you’re not moving around as much and you’re not sleeping as well because the pain is keeping you up at night. My advice to you is do not wait until you become deconditioned. If there’s a moderate amount of pain, and you go and see your surgeon, elect to have the surgery done. It’s a good surgery that
will give you good outcomes. Obviously discuss these things with your surgeon, but please make them aware that you want to live the later parts of your life with total quality, not just knee quality. Most top surgeons do take this into consideration.

Now that you have some insight into what is a life changing procedure, enjoy your birthday cake and begin to make some birthday wishes that don’t revolve around pain. And you can sleep a little better knowing it will take much more to kill you than a bad pair of knees.

If you feel that any of the information we’ve given you here resonates with you and you feel we are in a position to help, please BOOK ONLINE as we would welcome the opportunity. If you feel that we can help you in any other way, please reach out to us via our CONTACT PAGE.

Knee Pain and Squats

squats knee physio parramatta peakhurst

One of the frustrating questions we often have to answer is: Are squats bad for your knees? This question often comes after somebody has been talking to their doctor or their trainer, or the butcher, maybe the mechanic, maybe even the guy down the street. Now obviously these people feel like they are authorities on the topic. And the advice given to them is that squats are bad for your knees. This couldn’t be further from the truth.

On the contrary, squats aren’t bad for your knees, squats are fantastic for your knees, and we actually use them here to improve knee health. Now, before I go on to divulge just how we do that, I first want to make one point clear. You can’t go and do squats badly, and then come and tell us that squats are bad for your knees. You can’t butcher the movement, butcher the training and abuse the way that you do the squat, and then come and proclaim that squats are bad for your knees. That wouldn’t be truthful and it wouldn’t be right. Squats done properly are the most efficient way to rehabilitate injured knees, and further strengthen healthy knees.

There are 3 important factors to consider when understanding why, contrary to mainstream advice, squats are beneficial for knee health:

  1. Squats need to be done correctly. They need to utilise the maximum amount of muscle mass, through the greatest effective range of motion.
  2. When done correctly, they maintain the strength balance between the major groups of muscles that create the most force on the knee joint.
  3. When done correctly, they are actually a hip drive movement, not a knee dominant movement. The loading on the knee joint itself is minimal.

Disclaimer: This is for Educational Purposes Only

Let me take a quick intercession to inform you as to the nature of our advice. We are experienced, healthcare clinicians. We wish to share our experience with you on topics to do with your health. We may be a little colourful in doing so, but at the heart of what we do is in-the-trenches experience. Whilst we have achieved academic success and understand the evidence, we are not solely evidence-based. We are, however, EVIDENCE INFORMED. 

We find that the evidence is usually 10-15years (at minimum) behind what we are seeing in the clinic. We see real people, with real problems, and we’ve made a great living out of offering real solutions. 

If all you’re after is the researched evidence, you can find some HERE, or you can very easily look for more on Google. We want to give you real-life advice, most of which you may not find in the research.

There is no way that this document can replicate or replace expert assessment and guidance given by a qualified registered healthcare practitioner who has seen you personally. I am sure you’re aware that I have no knowledge of your personal medical history or how you take care of your body. If you require care from a qualified practitioner, you would be best served by seeing someone who can empathise with your situation and treat you accordingly.

I’m sure you understand that I disclaim any and all responsibility for anything you do as a result of reading this document. And by reading this article, you accept 100% responsibility for the actions of you or anyone under your care.

When we’re discussing squats done correctly, we’re talking about a few different criteria that have to be met. The first one is that you have to have a stance about hip-width apart with toes pointed out about 40°. This foot position may vary for different people, but that’s a good starting point. This forces the big glute muscles into action during the squat and allows the groin muscles to act as hip extensors. What this also does, is render every comment made by a physiotherapist that “your glutes aren’t activating” utterly stupid and meaningless.

The second one is that you have to take your bum back and lean forward, with a more horizontal back angle. This is counterintuitive to the normal teaching, where most trainers would teach you to keep your back more vertical. The reason for this is that it forces the hamstring muscles to act as anchors against your lower back and pelvis. Now the hamstrings are involved in a movement that was once thought of (stupidly) as a quadriceps exercise.

The third factor is that as you descend into the squat, we want your knees to shove outwards in the same direction as your toes are pointing. Doing this gets your knees out of the way, so your hips can actually sink below the top of the knees at the bottom position. This bottom position is referred to as the below parallel position. It will look like the bottom of your bum is sitting down below your knees, with your knees shoved out hard.

knee squat recovery

If you follow these basic criteria, you’ll be able to hit a great looking squat. The cue we use to guide this movement is “ass back, lean forward, knees out!” Done this way you will gain a full effective range of motion. A full effective range of motion is important because it utilises the maximum amount of muscle mass. And utilising more muscle means that when you begin to load the squats with weight, you can lift more weight. Lifting more weight, means you can get stronger. And that’s exactly what we want for your knees. We want them, and you, to get stronger.

Squats, even when they’re hacked, will load the front muscles of the thigh known as the quadriceps muscles. Done correctly however, good squats will load the large group of muscles at the back of the thigh known as the Hamstrings. When we discuss knee health, the Quadriceps and the Hamstrings are important because they are the biggest force actors on the knee joint. A well-performed squat trains these muscles within the whole system, because the squat is a full-body movement that trains the whole body. As you descend into the squat, the Quadriceps pull the knee forward and the Hamstrings fight against that by pulling the knee backward, creating consistent tension through the movement.

When you go down in a proper range of motion with your hips just below your knees at the bottom of the squat, there’s a constant tension between the Hamstrings and the Quadriceps. This allows for really good knee health as it strengthens those muscles and it also creates a really tense knee capsule that houses the knee joint. All those ligaments and tendons get stronger and ensure that you have really stable, strong knees.

knee squat recovery

Now when we describe to patients why squats are great for your knees, we’re also spending time telling them why squats are not bad for your knees. there’s often a misconception that if you hear lots of clicking and clacking through the knees, then squats can be bad for your knees. Done incorrectly they can be, but if you do them correctly with more of a horizontal back angle, with your knees shoved out, and allowing your hips to sink below your knees in the bottom position, you won’t load the knees improperly. You’ll actually load the hips.

The squat is predominantly a hip centric movement. It promotes hip drive. Do it correctly in this way and you’ll avoid excessive load on the knees and you’ll actually strengthen your knees and your hips. If you do it in this fashion, all the muscles in the legs will get stronger, the glute muscles will get stronger, the back muscles will get stronger, it’s a total body movement. The whole body will get stronger.

Now one main thing I want to discuss with you when it comes to squatting, is that squatting is a natural human movement that humans have done ever since humans have been around. In the very earliest years of a child’s life, a toddler will spend most of their day sitting in a great looking squat playing with their toys. They get in and out of the squat seamlessly and effortlessly and they do it all day long. Another point I want to make is that every time you go to the bathroom to relieve yourself, you’re actually squatting down. Now before the advent of the modern toilet seat you used to squat down a lot further. When you look at these two factors, any logical thinking person would understand that squatting is one of the most adapted positions the body has.

We have spent our human existence building resilience to this position because it is obviously beneficial to our existence and our physical interaction with the world. As we get older, we have things that we need to worry about, like getting out of a seat, getting out of a car, getting off the toilet. If you want to do these things without pain and much effort, you need to learn how to squat properly. Be cautious about taking advice from anyone that tells you otherwise, as they generally haven’t thought about it enough to care.

Look, knee pain is one of the common issues that will decondition your body rapidly. You don’t want to get deconditioned. Keeping your knees healthy and strong is vital for a great quality of life. The most effective way to do this is to squat. Learn how to do it properly, plan it into your life and your knees will thank you for it.

If you feel that any of the information we’ve given you here resonates with you and you feel we are in a position to help, please BOOK ONLINE as we would welcome the opportunity. If you feel that we can help you in any other way, please reach out to us via our CONTACT PAGE.

A Pain In The Elbow: Golfer’s Elbow

Golfers elbow massage pain

Gripping things with your hands is about a basic human function as you can get. So when you get pain associated with gripping, the impact it has on what you can or can’t do is directly associated with how useful you are as a person. And since we all want to be useful (most of us), we need to address some of the main conditions that cause pain with gripping.

Such is the importance of the gripping function, people with amputated hands, fingers and/or nerve damage that reduces their gripping are often deemed “disabled.” Now before you go and start using the disabled car spaces, let’s just discuss how you’re able to overcome one of the main causes of painful gripping.

One of the common conditions that cause pain on the inside of the elbow is known as Golfer’s Elbow. The medical term for this is medial epicondylitis. This is generally characterised with pain that’s quite tender and achy and bruised to touch. It also feels quite tender and achy to grip and use your forearm.

Disclaimer: This is for Educational Purposes Only

Let me take a quick intercession to inform you as to the nature of our advice. We are experienced, healthcare clinicians. We wish to share our experience with you on topics to do with your health. We may be a little colourful in doing so, but at the heart of what we do is in-the-trenches experience. Whilst we have achieved academic success and understand the evidence, we are not solely evidence-based. We are, however, EVIDENCE INFORMED. 

We find that the evidence is usually 10-15years (at minimum) behind what we are seeing in the clinic. We see real people, with real problems, and we’ve made a great living out of offering real solutions. 

If all you’re after is the researched evidence, you can find some HERE, or you can very easily look for more on Google. We want to give you real-life advice, most of which you may not find in the research.

There is no way that this document can replicate or replace expert assessment and guidance given by a qualified registered healthcare practitioner who has seen you personally. I am sure you’re aware that I have no knowledge of your personal medical history or how you take care of your body. If you require care from a qualified practitioner, you would be best served by seeing someone who can empathise with your situation and treat you accordingly.

I’m sure you understand that I disclaim any and all responsibility for anything you do as a result of reading this document. And by reading this article, you accept 100% responsibility for the actions of you or anyone under your care.

So the movement that actually causes this is gripping. The main concern has to do with gripping and using your elbow and your wrist whilst you’re gripping. Movements like gripping and twisting, gripping and pulling, gripping and hammering, gripping and chopping will aggravate the inflammation. Anything that uses your wrist and your elbow whilst you’re gripping will tend to put the strain on the tendons and cause them to get really swollen, inflamed and cause some pain at your elbow.

What happens is all these tendons on the inside of your forearm – the ones that close your fingers – attach onto one point on the inside of your elbow, called the Common Flexor Origin. As those tendons get tighter and tighter, and they pull on that bone, the bone will actually become inflamed. That will then add to your pain as well.

If you have had a Golfer’s Elbow condition for a relatively short period of time (2-6 weeks) the condition is considered to be fairly fresh and can be treated using some basic guidelines. This advice mainly relates to people who are suffering from this condition for a short period of time, and how they can help themselves or how we can help them to improve that condition.

The treatment that we do for this involves looking at this problem from a few different angles.

  1. This problem needs to be considered as an upper limb condition.
    This means that you don’t just look at the elbow, you need to look at the wrist, the elbow, the shoulder, and the thoracic spine, and make sure that mechanically they’re all working well together.
  2. The second strategy is you need to manage inflammation.
    We can use ice, and we can use movement to actually help drain out inflammation and reduce inflammation in that area if we need to.
  3. A third strategy that we need to implement is called load management. So we need to manage the kind of loads that we put on it.
    We can’t overload it otherwise it will just keep getting inflamed and the process will repeat itself, but we can’t underload it because it will get weak.

So what you need to do is you need to find a point where you can do the work that you need to do, but not overload it. And then you gradually increase that load bit by bit, generally from week to week. Over time, that should help improve the actual condition. As the muscles don’t get weak, you can still function and the inflammation should die down gradually.

Now, some people will speak to me and say, “Well, look, I’ve had this problem for a good 3-4 months, it just doesn’t go away. I’ve seen a lot of people about it, it’s been going on for a long time, and I just can’t shake it.”

In these particular circumstances, there may be a lot of microtrauma at that particular area on the inside of your elbow, which means that every time you use it, you increase that microtrauma.

The strategy that we need to implement to actually overcome this is quite painful. It’s not nice, and it requires that we go in there and actually really work hard on the inside of that elbow and create some hyper inflammation. What that will do is it will bring on a cascade of events where your body will actually try and heal that area.

So previously, your body was in a state of chronic inflammation and some kind of tissue thickening that it just wasn’t getting out of. When we go in there, we beat it up, your body thinks that you’ve just hurt yourself, and that starts to repair the area. So we need to be a little bit firmer with you, and maybe a little bit painful, but we get to a point where it’s really hyper inflamed and it’s really swollen and then we ice it back down.

We basically get you to the point where the strategies I discussed earlier with you when this is a short term problem become applicable. When that happens, the tissue should repair quite well and you’ll find that your pain reduces quite significantly. No need for forearm straps, wraps or any kind of device.

Follow these guidelines when you feel that pain on the inside of your elbow is making you less useful than you’d like to be. Because we’d prefer that you be useful, and not take the disabled car spaces from those people who actually need them.

If you feel that any of the information we’ve given you here resonates with you and you feel we are in a position to help, please BOOK ONLINE as we would welcome the opportunity. If you feel that we can help you in any other way, please reach out to us via our CONTACT PAGE.

Getting Your Pillow Right

One of the major obstacles to improving the upper back and neck pain that people often complain about, is getting their pillow right. Waking up in the morning with a stiff aching neck is not the first thing you want to be feeling after opening your eyes in the morning.

A lot of people ask us to tell them what the best pillow is for them, and here I will attempt to at least explain to you what a good pillow should do and also, some of the problems we encounter when helping people get a better night’s sleep.

Disclaimer: This is for Educational Purposes Only

Let me take a quick intercession to inform you as to the nature of our advice. We are experienced, healthcare clinicians. We wish to share our experience with you on topics to do with your health. We may be a little colourful in doing so, but at the heart of what we do is in-the-trenches experience. Whilst we have achieved academic success and understand the evidence, we are not solely evidence-based. We are, however, EVIDENCE INFORMED. 

We find that the evidence is usually 10-15years (at minimum) behind what we are seeing in the clinic. We see real people, with real problems, and we’ve made a great living out of offering real solutions. 

If all you’re after is the researched evidence, you can find some HERE, or you can very easily look for more on Google. We want to give you real-life advice, most of which you may not find in the research.

There is no way that this document can replicate or replace expert assessment and guidance given by a qualified registered healthcare practitioner who has seen you personally. I am sure you’re aware that I have no knowledge of your personal medical history or how you take care of your body. If you require care from a qualified practitioner, you would be best served by seeing someone who can empathise with your situation and treat you accordingly.

I’m sure you understand that I disclaim any and all responsibility for anything you do as a result of reading this document. And by reading this article, you accept 100% responsibility for the actions of you or anyone under your care.

Now it’s important that I discuss with you some of the sleeping patterns we find people get into. These patterns will generally tell us how comfortable you are at night – in your bed and on your mattress – and it will also add to our knowledge as to why you have these aches and pains in your neck.

  1. The first pattern is people sleeping on their backs.
  2. The second one is people sleeping on their side.
  3. And the third one, the one that we don’t recommend, is people sleeping on their stomachs.

The reason why we don’t recommend that is that when you sleep on your stomach, you have to extend and rotate your neck to be able to breathe and fall asleep. That’ll put a lot of tension on your upper back and neck and you will find that that is something that you will not recover from really well because you’re doing it for eight hours a night.

This is one of the main problems that I encounter when I’m trying to help people find a better night’s sleep. They often complain that the only position they could fall asleep in is on their stomach.

The two main reasons why people do this is:

  1. They’ve just been accustomed to it for so long, and
  2. There’s generally an underlying mechanical or postural problem in their upper back and neck that needs addressing or treatment.

Now when we transition people from laying on their stomachs to laying on their backs, or when we transition people from laying on their stomachs to laying on their side, we need to use pillows as props to stop them from moving one way or the other.

So when you go from laying on your stomach to laying on your back, you need a pillow under your neck. You need a pillow under your knees. You also need a pillow on either side of your arms to stop you from rolling over.

When you’re going from laying on your stomach to trying to sleep on your side, you need a pillow under your neck, you need a pillow in between your knees, and you should have a pillow underneath your top armpit that you hug that stops you from rolling forward back onto your stomach. Now, if you persevere through that for a few nights, 3-4-5 nights, that along with the treatment that we’re offering you should help you then transition from sleeping on your stomach to a better sleeping pattern either on your back or on your side.

side sleeping pain physio

With regards to sleeping on your back, a good pillow should allow your head to sit back comfortably into the pillow and facilitate that backward curve of the neck. You should feel it more so supporting your neck and less on the back of your head. If you find that your pillow is pushing you too far forward or your head is too far forward, you might find that the pillow is too thick.

If you find the opposite, that your pillow allows your head to go too far backward or extend, then you might find the pillow is too thin, and you’ll have to make sure you test out for that.

With regards to people who sleep on their side, a good pillow should fill the gap between your neck and your shoulders. That’ll stop your head from tilting one way or the other when you’re asleep at night. If you find that you have broader shoulders, you might need to thicker pillow. If you find that you have narrow shoulders, you might need a thinner pillow. Again, you have to add that to your testing.

Now with regards to buying a pillow, if you’re spending more than $100 on a pillow, you’re generally paying for marketing or for gimmicky tempura memory foam nonsense that you just don’t need. A good pillow shouldn’t be more than $100. We often test people here at the clinic and help them find the right pillow. So if you need our help with that, just ask us.

So when choosing the right pillow for you, do some testing. First, make sure you’re sleeping either on your back or side. Second, check that the pillow supports your neck in a neutral position, and third, don’t fall for gimmicky marketing. A good pillow will be affordable. Enjoy your night’s sleep

If you feel that any of the information we’ve given you here resonates with you and you feel we are in a position to help, please BOOK ONLINE as we would welcome the opportunity. If you feel that we can help you in any other way, please reach out to us via our CONTACT PAGE.

Getting Your Mattress Right

Getting Your Mattress Right

One of the main questions I often get asked in the clinic is what kind of bed should I buy. Should I buy a firm bed a medium bed or a soft bed? Before I answer that question, I’m going to discuss with you some of the things you may feel when your bed is actually contributing to your aches and pains.

  1. The first one is if you’re waking up in the morning, with aches, pains and stiffness, and you’re otherwise generally healthy, you have a generally healthy spine, that may be an indication that your bed is contributing to those aches and pains.
  2. The second one, is if you can’t find a comfortable position to sleep in if you’re constantly tossing and turning. And there’s physical discomfort – doesn’t have to be a huge amount of pain – just discomfort, that may also be an indication that your bed is contributing to your aches and pains.
  3. The third, one and the dead giveaway, is if you go to bed and you start to feel yourself sinking into the bed within about 20 minutes. It’s probably time to get your bed replaced.

Disclaimer: This is for Educational Purposes Only

Let me take a quick intercession to inform you as to the nature of our advice. We are experienced, healthcare clinicians. We wish to share our experience with you on topics to do with your health. We may be a little colourful in doing so, but at the heart of what we do is in-the-trenches experience. Whilst we have achieved academic success and understand the evidence, we are not solely evidence-based. We are, however, EVIDENCE INFORMED. 

We find that the evidence is usually 10-15years (at minimum) behind what we are seeing in the clinic. We see real people, with real problems, and we’ve made a great living out of offering real solutions. 

If all you’re after is the researched evidence, you can find some HERE, or you can very easily look for more on Google. We want to give you real-life advice, most of which you may not find in the research.

There is no way that this document can replicate or replace expert assessment and guidance given by a qualified registered healthcare practitioner who has seen you personally. I am sure you’re aware that I have no knowledge of your personal medical history or how you take care of your body. If you require care from a qualified practitioner, you would be best served by seeing someone who can empathise with your situation and treat you accordingly.

I’m sure you understand that I disclaim any and all responsibility for anything you do as a result of reading this document. And by reading this article, you accept 100% responsibility for the actions of you or anyone under your care.

Now when you combine this information with the age of the bed and we generally recommend 5-7 years, it will give you an indication if you need to replace your bed or not. Most mattresses come with 10-year warranties, but that just means they’re not going to fall apart in 10 years. It does not mean that it will do its job of contributing to good spinal health.

Sleep matteress

Okay, now you’ve decided to buy a new mattress, what kind of mattress should you buy? Well let’s get one point clear first. Don’t fall for all that memory foam tempura, bamboo foam, gimmicky nonsense that they’ve got out there. They don’t help and they don’t offer anything that is worth the extra money you spend on them. One more thing they don’t do is they don’t offer any kind of recovery for your spine at night. They just conform to all the compression that you’ve built up through the day.

Traditional spring-loaded mattresses will actually offer some kind of relief because they will help change your spine at night as you’re sleeping, in a good way.

And this is why a traditional spring-loaded FIRM mattress is generally better for you. This can be applied to roughly 80% of the population based on the feedback and results we see in the clinic. The reason why a firm spring-loaded mattress is better for you, is because it offers traction at night when you’re laying down.

When you’re laying down at night, your spine is like a flattened out S curve. with gravity acting down on that S curve, it’ll pull the ends apart and cause traction on all those little ligaments, discs and muscles throughout your spine. We want that because that’s good for recovery when you’re sleeping at night. Most of you through the day, when you’re sitting or standing, gravity is acting on your spine in a compressive way, there’s compression squeezing all those spinal structures together. When you’re sleeping at night, you want traction. Traction tends to somewhat reverse or help recover some of that compressive load that’s happened throughout the day. So again, the main point to take away, look for a traditional spring-loaded mattress that’s firm. That’ the recommendation that we have given to our clients when they ask us, and it has served them well over the years.

And what about your pillow? Here’s how to get your pillow right.

If you feel that any of the information we’ve given you here resonates with you and you feel we are in a position to help, please BOOK ONLINE as we would welcome the opportunity. If you feel that we can help you in any other way, please reach out to us via our CONTACT PAGE.